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20130104
20130112
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
look at many of you here today, knowing many of you have a key role in energy policy today, and hopefully what might happen over the next year or two as we consider the truly game changing opportunity we have here in the united states as it relates to energy. before i proceed and share remarks with you, i would like to introduce our friends at the head table today. i would like to begin with a new great cheerleader of energy that has come to the united states senate from the state of north dakota. senator, would you stand, please? [laughter] [applause] i think i finally found someone who is a bigger cheerleader than i am. we look forward to working with you. she is truly an expert in the area of oil and natural gas. she has been the tax commissioner and the state attorney general. she knows the industry well. let me quickly go around and introduce others. walter, if you would please stand. walt is the general president of the iron workers union. let me introduce doug. he is the president of the united brotherhood of carpenters heard we work closely. we have 15 unions now. t
these four schools. each exhibits a new energy and renewed sense of purpose and more schools are lining up to be transformed in the years ahead. of course, reform could not be complete without supporting our teachers. they have dedicated their lives to our children. for the first time in a very long time, we're dedicating new resources for them as well. we know success is possible. we have seen it paired with a cooperative effort where every voices heard, we are going to replicate it in classes around our state. the bottom line is, students will be better prepared for school today and for the job market tomorrow. [applause] when it came to energy, our state had been a national leader for years in the worst possible way. we had the highest electric rates in the continental united states. rates that are squeezing the budgets of families and businesses. we came together and decided we needed a plan to take these problems head on. we realized our economic, environmental, and economic needs were all related, and that the path we chose would impact our economy in the state for years to come. con
information about the kinds of injuries and what sort of energies and what are the source of the injuries? it kind of reminded me in a meeting yesterday. i was around in the 1970's. the only guy who can remember this -- i hope i am not insulting him -- is ray lahood. he remembers the auto industry. he remembers the whole question of traffic safety and highway safety. there was a big fight when i first got in the senate that began in the late 1960 fell through early 1970's. the automobile industry did not want to allow the department of transportation to acquire statistics on the type of accidents that occur. they were not able to literally acquire the information. because the concern was it would lead to calls for some rational regulations for the guardrails for automobiles. i remember when we finally broke through and the department of transportation started keeping misinformation, they found out -- if my memory is correct -- the vast majority of drivers -- the steering wheel damage to their solar plexus, penetrated their upper body cavity, damaged their heart. the reason the industry di
, and water energy companies. we are working with policymakers and representatives from private industries and institutions to affectively and strategically identify and address cyber security policy issues within the states. finally, i want to talk for a moment about the energy and energy security. i am proud to say that my state of oklahoma, working along with democratic governor from colorado, has teamed up with 22 other states to work for the conversion of our state automobile fleets from traditional gas-powered vehicles and trucks to natural gas vehicles. we -- when we come by all of our state's purchasing power we were able to let a national bid which has driven down the price of cng-powered vehicles by thousands of dollars, making the vehicles more affordable for state budgets and the private sector. each automobile has the potential to save $20,000 in fuel costs, freeing up resources for priorities like education and health care. just as important, our initiative supports the production of american-made natural gas and the creation of american jobs, which will once again benefit ou
, quirky and fun. >> talking about new things, new ways that you're experimenting, you also have energy projects. again, we have an article in the world in 2013 about the extraordinary reduction in cost of solar power, for example, something similar to solar panels. >> there is a china law which is china sort of overproduces to the point of bankruptcy. that is why the panel is so low. it's close. >> do you see technology transforming our energy situation? >> although it's controversial, the fact of the matter is we should give credit to the people who invented the new forms of oil and natural gas drilling generally known as fracking, hydraulic fracking and so forth. those are resources that help us find pore of this stuff. we can have a discussion about recommendation and so forth. it's very controversial. that has materially changed the economic structure of energy in america. if you take a look at conservation and renewables which i think is ultimately the right answer, what you see now is the automation and instrumentation of passive systems, it changes everything. it goes under the
around 3.1%. they're desperate for workers, truckers, people who can contribute to where the energy industry is right now. things like what you are talking about here, to have to pick yourself up and start over again -- 57 can feel pretty old. on the other hand, you have got 10 more years of working life ahead of you before you can get your full social security benefits. you've got to not given, if you can help it, and try to find the energy and commitment to start over again. there are jobs out there, but it is not easy to change. host: one of our viewer saying, with weak demand in a number of key sectors, what is happening with the retraining effort? guest: that is something congress will have to work out again. that tends to be on the spending side. i think that the community colleges in this country are really trying hard to pick up some of the slack and work with businesses to come up with training programs. the one thing that everyone has learned some lessons about is the nonsensical student loans, taking out a bunch of student loans, going to community college and never finis
job investments. the tax credit you mentioned which supports clean energy jobs. if this had been allowed to expire as many as 37,000 clean energy jobs could have been lost. mortgage debt relief which protects home owners from paying taxes on forgiven deat and bonus depreciation. so going back to the first point this package of tax extenders was supported on a buy partisan basis. the president supported it but you would have to spend disbelief to accept the premise that republicans did not. >> is there a moment that the president sat down with senator hagel and offered him the job and had a hart to heart talk about what direction he would like to see the pentagon move in? >> the president did taufer senator the job over the weekend by phone. they have a long relationship that dates back to their service together nth senate. they travelled together abroad and senator hagel after he left the senate was co-chair of the president's intelligence advisory board. so they have had an ongoing conversation about this nation's national security needs and the president's policies in the last
on society including health care energy. tomorrow morning, president obama's announcement of his nominees to head the defense department and cia. we will hear from the former house intelligence committee ranking member. she will take your questions about the nomination of john brennan to head the central intelligence agency. we will look at the nomination of senator chuck hagel to be secretary of defense with the foreign policy reuter. -- which the foreign policy writer. john talks about relations between the united states and afghanistan. "washington journal" is live on c-span every day at 7:00 eastern. >> i think cyber security remains a top priority because of the national-security implications. we saw that congress failed to reach an agreement in 2012. they remain far apart. the industry is opposed to any server security standards. >> another big issue will be implementing the incentive options to create more spectrum. the fcc is in the midst of working on that. some of the hot-button issues are unlicensed spectrum that powers wi-fi. >> net neutrality could be a big issue. the d.c. ci
in the '80s campaign. was still covering the energy crisis on three mile island and the aftermath of that and a lot of other things, nuclear power. >> you know, there's so much attention to what women on tv wear and what they look like and their hair. is that still true? >> well -- >> or is it getting better in. >> an article -- >> i saw that. >> the first i heard about it. >> a story very recently about the clothes that women anchors wearing. they're not wearing suits as much. it was only about women. right? >> yeah. seems to me, frankly, a little silly and beside the point. the exciting thing is we're covering major beats, that we have women in very important roles, both in front of and behind the cameras. we have women executive producers. this is very important. and vice presidents and running our major broadcasts, and making very big decisions. >> don't feel that women get put on tv for looks if they have blonde, poofy hair. >> some places yes but my experience has been in three -- more than 34 years now with nbc news, and before that, i was a proud employee of post-news week
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)